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7

All for a sense of Purpose

Human beings as a species are one with unbridled energy and passion. When this energy is not given the right direction or even left untapped it results in likes of the mindless violence, fast on to death acts, bomb blasts and more that have shook the nation last week

Idolizing a Film star

Being extremely apathetic to film stars of all kinds I occupy a lonely corner here in the city Chennai where every person I know in a “Thalivar” fan. From desktop backgrounds to dialogues pitched in normal conversations, Orkut album snaps and even ring tones revolve around this man. Though I think I can understand hero worship to a reasonable extent, the violence that followed Dr.Rajkumars death is absolutely not comprehendible.

Driven my curiosity, I tried to read about the life this man led and all the major events that made him, what he is remembered as today. I can now safely say that the general perception is that he was an outstanding actor who acted in about 200 films for about five decades, a model husband and father, and lastly but not the least a champion of Kannad language and people. His having survived the Veerappan ordeal after 108 days of captivity was one that left many surprised but thankful nevertheless.

But still he is only human, is he not? One who unlike many others had a chance to live life to his fullest and die at a ripe old age 77. I would say his passing away due to cardiac arrest was anything but abnormal, given that he is but mortal like all of us. Then why this unprecedented violence? The images on NDTV of police force being assaulted, mobs attacking vehicles on the street was a shocking sight indeed and the first thought that stuck me was would a similar situation arise here in Chennai on the death of say one of the all time big hero’s? Then on further googling I found out about the violence that had followed the death of the Tamil icon MGR, but with a difference; then the fans had killed themselves in grief rather than inflicting violence on others and on public property.

Maybe the death of any icon is a loss, a depletion of identity in a world where each one of us is bordering on or facing an identity crisis. The need to relate to something/someone buds from the fact that many of us are still searching for a higher sense of purpose to live.
I think as usual this loss and emotional anger was used by the anti-social elements very likely driven by a political vendetta. At this point I can almost hear people who are reading this react with an exclamation “So what’s new about that?” Take a moment to reflect on last statement. What is worth noting here is how easily this particular idea has become acceptable to all of us. Integrity, veraciousness and other values on the same line have become a thing of the past. Looks like we have accepted that “All’s fair in war and politics”. Hmm… yes, we have entered the era where cynicism and apathy for anything that does not have first hand involvement (a case of extreme selfishness) rules. Sad but true.


On that note I am getting back to the conundrum of debits and credits
Until next post
Take care

7 comments:

Goutham said...

The juxtaposition of text and pictures in some of the poetry is beautiful. On reading some of your posts, atleast for a fleeting moment, I have a craving to write. (Though I may not for any convenient excuse that I might find.) Keep up the good work.

Debaditya said...

"I would say his passing away due to cardiac arrest was anything but abnormal":-S

Raaga said...

"Then on further googling I found out about the violence that had followed the death of the Tamil icon MGR, but with a difference; then the fans had killed themselves in grief rather than inflicting violence on others and on public property."

I've seen Madras react to MGR's death and I've seen the city react to Rajiv Gandhi's assassination. I can't remember violence of this sort. Looting happened, no doubt. The general public probably believes in making hay while the sun shines. Do I think its OK? NO! But do I understand motives there? Maybe.

When someone dies of a cardiac arrest at the ripe old age of 78, I take it they'd be able to figure out the route as they embark on their last journey quite by themselves. Whoever thought that Rajkumar would be accompanied by innocent Bangaloreans on his last journey.

There will probably always be things that we don't understand.

Caffeinism said...

@ g'man-Thank you
@ Deba- What was that?Sorry cannot follow
@Raaga-I agree.Could not get your url though...

Raaga said...

I don't have a blog as yet. I keep starting, but never seem to get there :)

Debaditya said...

i guess that should have been "normal" instead

Caffeinism said...

@ deba-ena -no its abnormal...anything but abnormal means -it is normal

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